Consumers pay attention to where your ads live and who their neighbors are!

The Chris Linder Thought You Might Be Interested… http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheMarketingMinute/~3/08uc6wZqbeU/consumers-pay-attention-to-where-your-ads-live-and-who-their-neighbors-are.html

The Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) Council came out with a new study that we all need to be aware of as we place our digital ad buys.

Nearly half of all consumers indicate they would rethink purchasing from brands or would boycott products if they encountered brand ads alongside digital content that offends them, reveals a new study on “How Brands Annoy Fans.”

Aimed at assessing the impact of digital advertising experiences on consumer perceptions and purchase intent, the research looked at digital brand safety from the consumer’s perspective and found that consumers are punishing even preferred brands if they don’t use trusted media platforms or take active steps to control the integrity of their ad environments.
Conducted by the Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) Council using the Pollfish platform, the survey gathered views from 2,000 adult consumers in North America and the U.K., both regions which have both seen high-profile brand campaigns withdrawn this year for their association with fake, distressing and hateful content. The consumer poll is part of a broader study of digital brand safety being conducted by the CMO Council, in partnership with Dow Jones, entitled “Brand Protection From Digital Content Infection.”

With trust more critical than ever, respondents made it clear that they will no longer give their brands a pass for even inadvertent display of ads near objectionable digital and video content. A full two-thirds of respondents said they would hold a dimmer view of brands that provided negative advertising experiences.

The report also found that social media platforms are still not trusted content spaces. Despite listing social media as the source of the second-highest volume of ad messages they receive—behind only television—consumers ranked social media last among their five most trusted channels. They ranked friends, TV, search engines and newspapers as more trusted sources.

A large majority of consumers said they responded differently to the same ad, depending on its context, with 63 percent saying they responded more positively to ads run in trusted media channels. Consumers are, in fact, turning to trusted content providers and media to escape objectionable content. Some 60 percent said offensive context has already caused them to consume more content from trusted, well-known news sources and established media channels.

“CMOs and brand advertisers are increasingly concerned about various aspects of digital and programmatic advertising, including concerns about their ads showing up next to offensive content,” said Donovan Neale-May, Executive Director of the CMO Council. “This consumer survey demonstrates that those concerns are well founded. Advertising placed next to objectionable content is damaging to a brand while ads that accompany more trusted content and media are more accepted.”

While other brand safety studies have explored adverse brand perceptions, the CMO Council research asked consumers about their response to the experience of finding brand ads in proximity to objectionable content or fake news sites—and their warning to advertisers was brutal. Some 37 percent of consumers said it would change the way they think of a brand when making a decision to buy. Another 11 percent said they would flat-out not do business with that brand. Another 9 percent said they would become vocal critics of the brand.

Another consumer response is the increased use of ad blockers. In another alarming finding for digital marketers, more than 50 percent of respondents said they either already had or planned to install some form of ad-blocking software to their mobile devices or PC browsers.

Negative experiences with digital display advertising are far from a rarity. According to the most recent “Media Quality Report” by Integral Ad Science (AIS), up to 8.6 percent of digital display ads in the U.S. were flagged as posing a moderate or high risk to brand reputation. Maria Pousa, CMO for IAS, told the CMO Council that the most prevalent categories of risk in the U.S. were violent, adult or offensive language content, followed by issues like hate speech and illegal downloads.

Other key insights from the CMO Council survey include:

  • A surprising 86 percent of consumers are either extremely concerned, very concerned or moderately worried about how easily they are directed or redirected to hateful or offensive content.
  • The most annoying digital advertising formats, even when appearing on trusted media channels, were intrusive pop-up ads (22 percent) and auto-playing video ads (17 percent).
  • Attention to digital advertising overall was notably low, with only 14 percent always engaged and 58 percent saying they pay attention only when ads either interest them or are really interesting.
  • Just over 40 percent of consumers have already installed ad-blocking software on their devices while another 14 percent said they planned to add these features.

Neale-May said the full report, featuring qualitative interviews and vendor insights, would include key details on the steps, tools and strategies adopted by leading advertisers and CMOs who have minimized the threat to their brands. The abbreviated consumer survey findings can be sourced from the CMO Council at https://www.cmocouncil.org/digitalad-consumer-report.

About the CMO Council

The Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) Council is dedicated to high-level knowledge exchange, thought leadership, and personal relationship building among senior corporate marketing leaders and brand decision-makers across a wide range of global industries. The CMO Council’s 12,500-plus members control more than $500 billion in aggregated annual marketing expenditures and run complex, distributed marketing and sales operations worldwide. In total, the CMO Council and its strategic interest communities include more than 30,000 global executives in more than 110 countries covering multiple industries, segments and markets.

The post Consumers pay attention to where your ads live and who their neighbors are! appeared first on Drew's Marketing Minute.

Creating your content machine

The Chris Linder Thought You Might Be Interested… http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheMarketingMinute/~3/k7UuLGqEUQ8/content-machine.html

content machineYou’re ready to get your content machine up and running but let’s revisit the information from last week where we covered some of the preliminary steps in creating a successful content strategy. They were:

  1. Identifying the business outcomes/goals for the strategy
  2. Knowing who you are targeting and what would be genuinely helpful to them
  3. Recognizing that the hub of your strategy needs to be a digital presence that you own and control completely (website versus a Facebook page)
  4. Creating a series of spokes (on and offline activity/channels) that will drive prospects to your hub

Once those tasks are complete, you can begin to think about creating your content machine focusing on the kinds of content and the volume/speed of your content creation. The hub and spokes will dictate how much content needs to be created.

Finally, it’s time to think about structure. You need to build a team that will be responsible for concepting/creating content, curating other people’s content, going out into the social space and telling people about available content, etc.

For this to work long-term, you need a few things:

  • A commitment (not just lip service) from the company owner/leadership
  • An allocation of time/resources that is as sacred as any client deadline
  • An editorial calendar that is persona focused
  • A cross-trained team large enough to meet all of the deadlines
  • Measurable business goals – that are regularly being measured/reported
  • An understanding that this is a long-term play and that expectations should be tempered in terms of quarters and years, not days or weeks
  • A marketing plan for promoting the content and the company

If a company is willing to invest the time and effort into doing it right, the business goals will be achieved if not exceeded over time. Sadly, most organizations are just going through the motions and will never really reap the benefits that content marketing can bring them. Worst – their self-serving efforts are costing them business as prospects check out their efforts and quickly move on to a company who is actually walking their talk.

The personas and editorial calendar should ultimately govern the content. Once you know who you’re talking to, you should build out an editorial calendar with content ideas that you know will be of value to one or more of the personas. Everyone on the team can contribute ideas but once the calendar has been set – it should be honored. Because content and social should be timely – there are going to be exceptions to the rule. It’s much easier to deviate from a plan than it is to plan as you go.

Because content and social should be timely – there are going to be exceptions to the rule. It’s much easier to deviate from a plan than it is to plan as you go.

All content should go through the usual creation process – including internal reviews and proofreading. So in that way, it’s governed by whoever owns that part of the process. Naturally, your company should already have its own graphic standards, branding criteria (both visual and voice) and those boundaries are honored as well.

It’s a little like publishing a monthly magazine. You’re always planning a few issues in advance. You have a defined look, feel and audience. You probably have some regular features or offerings. But what drives the entire process is that editorial calendar and the agreement that deadlines will be honored, no matter how busy you are.

Sadly, this generation of business leaders aren’t all going to get it. Some will dismiss it because they don’t personally participate in social networks. Some are afraid to learn about it. Others will believe it’s only worthwhile if your customer is a <fill in the blank> but not for their clients.

That’s great news for the businesses who do get it. It just means the bounty will be even greater.

Content marketing achieved through a well-oiled content machine can be the great equalizer for organizations. It allows small companies, organizations in secondary markets and those with the tenacity to create a library of useful, smart content to not only compete but to win big.

The post Creating your content machine appeared first on Drew's Marketing Minute.

How To Create a Billion Dollar Company

The Chris Linder Thought You Might Be Interested… https://www.retireat21.com/blog/how-to-create-a-billion-dollar-company

Characteristics of a Billion Dollar Company

Recently I have been looking at some of the worlds most success billionaires such as Bill Gates, Richard Branson and Steve Jobs. Although only being 21 years old, I often feel like I’m not achieving as much as I really can, I look at other people who at my age are so much further ahead – sure in some respects I had to come further as I didn’t give a thought in the world to my education till a year after I had done my exams.

They Are The Best At What They Do

Look at Google, we use it because it gives us the results we are looking for quicker than any other search engine, the same applies to Facebook, we use it as it’s the most user friendly and has all our friends in one place. These are prime examples of businesses that just do it better than anyone else, and that is what you have got to do. Whether you are selling online toiletries or you are starting your own social network, it doesn’t matter, what does matter is that the business you own or run is working at full capacity with everything done the absolute best it can be done. Just try your hardest.

They Go For Mass Markets

No one has ever become a billionaire by targeting a small market, all the top companies have mass appeal such as Microsoft who’s aim is to have a computer in every house hold. Having said this, I do believe the best way to approach going to a mass market is starting small and being known for doing one thing great, like Zappos did. They sold only shoes when they started and once they became the worlds leader at selling shoes online, they branched out and started selling clothing and then later a whole lot of other things – that company later sold for $1,300,000,000!

They Use Their Time Wisely

Bill Gates wouldn’t go on Twitter and bitch about how his iPhone is broken or how one of his employees is an idiot, that would be a complete waste of time. Doing some quick maths I worked out that while working for Microsoft he would of made around $630,000 a hour so if he was to spend so much time like us just complaining and giving excuses then he would be a lot poorer. Time is money, it’s a phrase thrown around a lot but it is seriously true, think of it this way, how much do you think you are worth? $5 per hour? $10 dollars? How about $100 per hour and more? Are you really doing as much work as you think you are? Or more importantly are you using your time to do those things as best you can?

They Are Not Scared To Work Hard

The internet has made it easy for some us to work only a small amount of time a day and still be able to make more than enough to support ourselves (take me for example) – however if you want to be a billionaire, you need to work really hard, that means late nights, grafting all the time and no submission. You have really got to work at it around the clock whether you are part of a team or you are the team, the only way to become successful is to do things, and take action, how can you become successful if you are not prepared to work hard? Another thing is to believe in yourself because you will get many doubters and that’s okay, they are entitled to their opinion, you just need to work like crazy to become successful and to basically prove the doubters wrong.

High Profit Margins

Profit margins are something of a daunting area to get involved in, but basically the more the margin in profit the more money these billionaires make, which is why it is essential for them to have the best marketing and advertising campaign, the best quality in products and the best branding they can achieve because this all helps the sales. Imagine if Apple had just had a small advertising campaign and they had poor quality control issues, the profits would be non-existent, however because of the sheer volume of sales for Apple products (on most levels) and the high quality of the product, the money made is very substantial, however because they are a big company they can leverage getting the best deal for their raw materials and this means high profits.

They buy low and sell high so the profit Are Large

Sticking with the above example the larger the company is the more weight they can put behind them to get the best deals for their products and services, smaller businesses do use this method too, although it is usually on a lot smaller scale and usually depends on them buying a minimum amount of materials. The more bulk materials you buy the more items can be made for a lot less, the more items that are made for little the higher the profit margin, and the higher the profit margin, the deeper their pockets become. This isn’t to say that you too cannot get in on this technique you just need to build rapport with your supplier and use as much leverage as you can, whether that leverage is the length of time you have been a valued customer, how many people you send to them or whatever else you can think of.

They Take Risks

Bill Gates, Richard Branson, Larry Page, Mark Zuckerberg and Henry Ford all have two things in common, they all dropped out of college, and they all became successful. In fact they become amongst the most successful people in the world and how did they manage it? They took risks, imagine where the world would be now if Bill Gates hadn’t started up his own software business? What would the world be like now if Henry Ford hadn’t built some of the first drivable vehicles in the world? What about if Richard Branson hadn’t started his own record label early in his career? The world would be a much less interesting place to be I think. The point is that they all took risks, and a couple of them still are taking risks. It’s like the SAS motto reads “He who dares, wins.” This saying is very true, do nothing, there will be nothing, no results, no money nothing. Try your hardest, and take some risks and you could see yourself end up successful.

The post How To Create a Billion Dollar Company appeared first on Young Entrepreneurs.

10 World Famous Companies that Started in Garages

The Chris Linder Thought You Might Be Interested… https://www.retireat21.com/blog/10-companies-started-garages

When I was growing up, my dad and I used the garage to build step stools, hot plates, and derby cars. As it turns out, a garage is also a great place to start a company.

To better understand how to build a world famous company, you need to dive into how other entrepreneurs have created theirs.

Here are ten of the world’s most gigantic businesses that started in garages.

10 Famous Garage Startups

Amazon Garage#1 Amazon

Jeff Bezos founded Amazon.com in 1994 as an online bookstore. At the time, it was completely run out of his garage in Bellevue, Washington.

He sold his first book in July 1995 and issued his IPO two years later in 1997.

Today it’s the world’s largest online retailer.

Address: 10704 NE 28th, Bellevue, Washington

Apple Garage#2 Apple

In 1976, Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, ages 21 and 26 respectively, started Apple Computers by selling 50 units of Wozniak’s Apple I Computer at $500 apiece to a local retailer. Jobs took the purchase order to a parts distributor and ordered the parts. “The Steves” and their small team hand-built 50 computers in 30 days from a garage in Cupertino, CA.

Today, Apple is the most valuable technology company in the world.

Address: 2066 Crist Dr, Los Altos, California

Disney Garage#3 Disney

About 45 minutes down the road from Disneyland Park in Anaheim, CA, there’s a house in Los Angeles where The Walt Disney Company got its start.

In 1923, the house belonged to Walt Disney’s uncle, Robert Disney. Walt and his brother Roy moved in with their uncle and set up “The First Disney Studio” in the one-car garage out back. There they started filming the Alice Comedies which was part of the original Alice’s Wonderland.

Today, Disney is the highest-grossing media conglomerate in the world.

Address: 4651 Kingswell Ave, Los Angeles, California

Google Garage#4 Google

As Stanford Graduate students, Larry Page and Sergey Brin started what’s now known as Google from Susan Wojcicki’s garage in September 1998.

Soon the project was interfering with their schoolwork, so they tried to sell it to Excite for $1 million. Excite rejected the offer and now Google is the most trafficked site in the world.

Address: 232 Santa Margarita Ave, Menlo Park, California

Harley Davidson Garage#5 Harley Davidson

In 1901, 21-year-old William S. Harley drew up plans to create a small engine to power a bicycle.

Over the next two years, Harley and his childhood friend, Arthur Davidson, built their motor-bicycle out of their friend’s 10 by 15-foot wooden shed in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. It was the equivalent of a garage because they didn’t have cars.

They officially founded Harley-Davidson in 1903 and today it’s the most well-known motorcycle brand in the world.

Address: Somewhere in northern Milwaukee, Wisconsin

HP Garage#6 Hewlett-Packard

In 1939, Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard founded HP in Packard’s garage with an initial investment of $538.

Their first product was an audio oscillator and one of their first customers was Walt Disney, who purchased eight oscillators to develop the sound system for the movie Fantasia.

The HP Garage in Palo Alto is known as the birthplace of Silicon Valley and HP is now one of the largest companies in the world.

Address: 367 Addison Ave, Palo Alto, California

Lotus Cars Garage#7 Lotus Cars

In 1948, at the age of 20, Anthony Colin Bruce Chapman started Lotus Cars by building the first Lotus racing car in stables behind The Railway Hotel in Hornsey, North London. Chapman used a 1930s Austin Seven and a power drill to build the Lotus Mark I.

Today Lotus Cars is one of the premier racing car manufacturers in the world.

Address: 472 Hornsey Rd, London N19 4EF, United Kingdom

Maglite Garage#8 Maglite

In 1950, Tony Maglica moved from his war-torn home of Croatia back to America. Knowing very little English, he settled in Los Angeles and took jobs wherever he could find them.

In 1955, after saving $125, Tony put a down-payment on his first lathe. Then he started working out of a Los Angeles area garage to manufacture precision parts. He incorporated Mag Instrument in 1974 and released their first flashlight in 1979.

Today, Maglite is the standard issue flashlight for all police officers in the US.

Address: Somewhere in Los Angeles, California

Mattel Garage Workshop#9 Mattel

Harold “Matt” Matson and Elliot Handler founded Mattel out of a garage in Southern California as picture frame company in 1945. To get the most out of their materials, they started using picture frame scrapes to create dollhouses.

Soon their dollhouses were selling better than their picture frames so they turned their emphasis to toys.

Today Mattel, Inc. is the highest-grossing toy company in the world.

Address: Somewhere in Southern California

Yankee Candle Company Garage#10 Yankee Candle Company

In 1969, at 16 years old, Michael Kittredge made his scented candle in his garage out of melted crayons as a gift for his mother. The neighbors took notice and expressed interest in buying Kittredge’s candles, so he started mass-producing them.

Four years later, Kittredge outgrew the garage so he moved the Yankee Candle Company to an old mill in Holyoke, Massachusetts.

Today it’s the largest manufacturer of scented candles in the US.

Address: Somewhere in South Hadley, Massachusetts.

What’s the Point?

Everything starts as nothing.

It’s easy to look at the world’s largest companies and think, “I could never start something like that.” And you’d be right. Most of these companies took decades to get where they are today.

They didn’t start by trying to create Amazon, Apple, and Google. They started by creating an online bookstore, a computer, and a search algorithm.

Whether it’s a garage, a basement, or a dorm room, every business has humble beginnings. It’s not about where you start. It’s where you end up.

Post written by Retireat21 writer, Nick Tart.

The post 10 World Famous Companies that Started in Garages appeared first on Young Entrepreneurs.

5 Crucial Tips for Maintaining Brand Consistency

The Chris Linder Thought You Might Be Interested… http://www.noobpreneur.com/2017/07/01/5-crucial-tips-for-maintaining-brand-consistency/

Ever stop and wonder what makes a brand like Coca-Cola one of the most recognized English words in the world?
Think I’m just blowing smoke? I’m not.
Coca-Cola, along with… Read more »

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